November 7 in Pop Culture History

November 7th History, Trivia, and Fun Facts

November 7th History Highlights

  • 1811 – The Battle of Tippecanoe took place in the Indiana territory.
  • Thomas Nast used The Elephant for the first time as the Republican symbol in Harper’s Weekly magazine (1874)
  • 1917 – The Bolshevik Revolution began in Petrograd, Russia.
  • 1962 – Richard M. Nixon, at a press conference, said “You don’t have Nixon to kick around anymore, because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.”
  • 1989 – Douglas Wilder became the elected African-American governor in the US
  • The London Gazette, the oldest ongoing publication (UK), was first published in 1665.
  • If you were born on November 7th,
    You were likely conceived the week of… February 14th (same year)

RIP Hero Jesús García Corona

Jesús García Corona (November 13, 1881 – November 7, 1907) was a Mexican railroad brakeman who died while driving a train, loaded with dynamite, from exploding near the mining town of Nacozari, Sonora.

November 7th is…

Hug a Bear Day
Little League Girls Day
National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day
National Canine Lymphoma Awareness Day, since 2015
Notary Public Day, since 1975
“You Go, Girl” Day

November 7th Birthday Quotes

“Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.”
– Albert Camus

“You will never be happy if you continue to search for what happiness consists of. You will never live if you are looking for the meaning of life.”
– Albert Camus

“My mother always told me I wouldn’t amount to anything because I procrastinate. I said, ‘Just wait.'”
– Judy Tenuta

“Love Goddess in training. It could happen.”
-Judy Tenuta

“Humanity needs practical men, who get the most out of their work, and, without forgetting the general good, safeguard their own interests. But humanity also needs dreamers, for whom the disinterested development of an enterprise is so captivating that it becomes impossible for them to devote their care to their own material profit.”
– Marie Curie

“But as I leave you, I want you to know: just think how much you’re going to be missing. You don’t have Nixon to kick around anymore. Because, gentlemen, this is my last press conference.”
– Richard Nixon at his ‘last’ press conference, in 1962.

“I can make everything I do come from my laptop.”
-David Guetta

November 7th Birthdays

1867 – Marie Curie, Polish chemist, and physicist (Nobel Prize laureate, died in 1934)
1879 – Leon Trotsky, Russian theorist, and politician (founded the Red Army, died in 1940)
1913 – Albert Camus, French novelist, philosopher, and journalist (Nobel Prize laureate died in 1960)
1918 – Billy Graham, American minister and author (died in 2018)
1922 – Al Hirt, American trumpet player, and bandleader (died in 1999)
1938 – Dee Clark, American Singer/Songwriter (died in 1990)
1942 – Johnny Rivers, American Singer/Songwriter, guitarist, and producer
1943 – Joni Mitchell, Canadian Singer/Songwriter, and guitarist
1951 – Lawrence O’Donnell, American journalist and talk show host
1956 – Judy Tenuta, American actress, producer, screenwriter, and accordion player
1957 – John ‘Jellybean’ Benitez, American DJ, songwriter, and producer
1957 – King Kong Bundy, American wrestler (aka Christopher Alan Pallies, died in 2019)
1957 – Christopher Knight, American actor
1964 – Dana Plato, American actress (died in 1999)
1967 – David Guetta, French DJ, record producer, remixer, and songwriter
1970 – Morgan Spurlock, American director, producer, and screenwriter
1972 – Jermey London, American actor
1979 – Amy Purdy, American actress, model, and snowboarder
1996 – Lorde, New Zealand Singer/Songwriter

November 7th History

1492 – The Ensisheim Meteorite, the oldest meteorite with a known date of impact, struck ground one afternoon in a wheat field outside the village of Ensisheim, Alsace, France.

1665 – The first edition of the London Gazette was printed. At the time it was called “The Oxford Gazette”.

1786 – The oldest musical organization in the United States was founded as the Stoughton Musical Society.

1811 – The Battle of Tippecanoe took place, with future US President, William Henry Harrison.

1874 – The first cartoon depicting the elephant as the Republican Party symbol, by Thomas Nast. He is also known as being the first to draw our modern version of Santa Clause.

1876 – The patent (#184,207) for the first US cigarette manufacturing machine was issued to Albert Hook of New York City.

1885 -The Canadian Pacific Railway, connecting the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, was completed.

1908 – Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid were reportedly killed in San Vicente, Bolivia.

1908 – Professor Ernest Rutherford announced in London that he had isolated a single atom of matter.

1910 – The first air freight shipment (from Dayton, Ohio, to Columbus, Ohio) took place, by the Wright brothers and department store owner Max Moorehouse.

1913 – Great Lakes Storm of 1913 lasted until November 10th. It killed over 250 people and was concentrated around Lake Huron.

1914 – The first issue of The New Republic magazine was published.

1916 – Jeannette Rankin (R) became the first woman elected to the United States Congress.

1917 – The Great October Socialist Revolution began in Russia

1929 – The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) opened to the public.

1932 – First broadcast of Buck Rogers in the 25th Century on CBS-radio. The Buck Rogers comic strip made its first newspaper appearance on January 7, 1929.

1944 – Franklin D. Roosevelt (D) was elected for a record fourth term as President of the United States of America.

1954 – Face The Nation premiered on NBC.

November 7, 1958 Birthday (fictional) Al Bundy, Married With Children, TV

1967 – President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Public Broadcasting Act of 1967, establishing the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

1967 – Carl B. Stokes (D) was elected as Mayor of Cleveland, Ohio, becoming the first African American mayor of a major American city.

1975 – The New Original Wonder Woman TV movie aired as a ‘test’ pilot for the series, Wonder Woman on ABC, starred Lynda Carter. It had very little in common with the 1974 TV movie entitled Wonder Woman starring Cathy Lee Crosby,

1976 – Gone With the Wind was televised for the first time. Gone with the Wind was originally a novel written by Margaret Mitchell, first published in 1936. The film was released in 1939.

1981 – #1 Hit November 7, 1981 – November 20, 1981: Daryl Hall and John Oates – Private Eyes

1987 – #1 Hit November 7, 1987 – November 20, 1987: Tiffany – I Think We’re Alone Now

1989 – Douglas Wilder (D) won the governor’s seat in Virginia, becoming the first elected African-American governor in the United States. Also, David Dinkins became the first African American to be elected Mayor of New York City.

1991 – Magic Johnson announced that he was infected with HIV and retired from the NBA.

2003 – Star Wars: Clone Wars debuted on The Cartoon Network. In addition to the feature films, this series is also generally considered ‘canon’ – which means it officially happened in the Star Wars universe.

2006 – At O’Hare International Airport, UFO Sighting Near Gate C-17 twelve employees reported seeing a metallic saucer-shaped craft hovering over the airport. The FAA stance concluded that the sighting was caused by a weather phenomenon and that the agency would not be investigating the incident, which many think is odd in the post-2001 security-enhanced world of airport security.

2009 – #1 Hit November 7, 2009 – November 13, 2009: Owl City – Fireflies

Today’s Random Trivia and Shower Thoughts

1/3 of marriages are now from online dating and that number is only increasing. That means that computers (algorithms) are starting to breed humans.

There are 336 dimples on a standard golf ball.

If we set our clocks to count down the hours left in the day instead of counting how many hours have passed, would we prioritize our time differently?

Burt Reynolds turned down the Jack Nicholson role in the movie Terms of Endearment.

Roulette Odds: Four number combination: Payoff: 8:1 True Odds: 10.53

In the mid 1920s the US Department of Prohibition ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols, products regularly stolen and resold as drinkable spirits. They did this to scare people out of drinking and to track where speakeasies were located.  This government program killed an estimated 10,000 people.

The Capital of Finland is Helsinki

TV Quotes… “You rang?” (Lurch) on The Addams Family

Pinocchio is loosely based on the Italian children’s novel The Adventures of Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi, published in 1883.

Both ‘Mama’ Cass Elliot (from The Mamas & the Papas) and Keith Moon (from The Who) died in the same place, owned by singer/songwriter Harry Nilsson (Lime in the Coconut Song).

A group of Phantoms is called a Phantasmagoria.

The former dictator of Equatorial Guinea, Francisco Macias Nguema, banned the use of lubricants in the Malabo city power plant, saying he could run it using magic. The plant exploded.

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