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Photo of White Fallow Stag by James P. Blair

Just an old photo of a white fallow stag in a forest in Switzerland, 1973. Photograph by James P. Blair. James P Blair is an esteemed and respected photographer for many places but most notable National Geographic.JamesPBlair

The Fallow deer is one of the most common Eurasian Deer and has been for the past 10,000 years. There really isn’t much more to point out other than that they’ve been a main source of food for humans for centuries. What I can talk about is the albino part of it.

“In certain cultures around the world, European, Native American, and Asian, there have been stories and myths told about white deer.

In European mythology magical animals are striking in appearance owing to their supernatural shape, color, speed, and power; a frequent attribute of those animals is an unnatural white color.

In Celtic mythology the pursuit of supernatural animals is a common theme. The white stag or hart often appears in the forests around King Arthur’s court, sending the knights on adventures against gods and fairies. One fable relates how King Arthur arrived at Sir Pellinore’s well, a magical site, without his hunting party or his horse after pursuing a white deer. The white stag was also the heraldic symbol of England’s King Richard II.

In Hungarian mythology a white stag led the brothers Hunor and Magar to settle in Scythia and to establish the Hun and Magyar people.

In Native American mythology there is the Chickasaw legend, Ghost of the White Deer. There is also a Lenape legend about white deer that predicts that when a pair of all-white deer is seen together, it is a sign that the indigenous peoples of the Dawnland will all come together and lead the world with their wisdom.

Many tribes and indigenous peoples throughout the world have similar myths. The Seneca, Roanoke, Algonquin, Nanticoke, and Pocomoke tribes all relate sightings of the Great White Deer.

In Kamakura, Japan, the Engakuji Temple, which was founded in 1282, is the head of a branch school of the Rinzai sect of Zen Buddhism. There a herd of divine white deer are said to have emerged from a cave to listen to the sermon of the temple’s founder the day it opened.” (Source protectthewhitedeer.com)

Would you shoot it? Or just take a picture?

We want to entertain you and any other potential history lovers out there and don’t forget to like Daily Historical Post for more!

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